Definition Of Law

From the Latin lex, a law is a rule or norm. It is a constant and invariable reason of things, which is born of a first cause. The requirements are, on the other hand, the existing relationships between the elements that intervene in a phenomenon.

In the field of law, the law is a precept issued by a competent authority. This text demands or prohibits something in line with justice and for the good of society as a whole. For example: “The sale of cocaine is punishable by law,” “The law prohibits the same person from voting twice in the same election,” “A good man never acts in a manner contrary to the law.”

Under a constitutional regime, the law is a provision approved by the courts and sanctioned by the head of state. Those actions that violate the law are punishable by different punishments depending on the nature and severity of the offense.

It can be said that laws limit the free will of human beings who live together in society; they function as an external control to which the conduct of the people is subjected to ensure that a series of norms that respond to the needs of the community are met. If a person considers that it is okay to perform an action that is punishable by law, it is normal that he refrains from doing so, leaving aside his individual belief.

The law (as a legal norm) must comply with various principles, such as generality (it includes all individuals), essential nature (it is imperative) and permanence (it is dictated indefinitely), among others. But the human being is not characterized by respecting other living people, whether or not their species and specific laws (or the absence of them) tend to evidence this sad reality. Such is the case, for example, of the struggle, carried out by those who want homosexual people to have the same rights as heterosexuals.

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